The problem within politics and fashion

I wrote this article for my journalism class and decided to share it here too, enjoy! Feel free to leave comments 

By Te'a DiNapoli

Fashion and Politics have always been intertwined, from the late 1960s miniskirt protest to Melania Trump channeling her inner Jackie O, there has never been a time in history where fashion wasn't a political statement. So why are people who enjoy fashion not taken seriously when speaking on political matters? Because there are still double standards instilled when it comes to taking interest in politics and fashion.

 Women protesting in Great Britten, in order to protect the mini skirt, outside the House of Dior in 1966, for its 'unfair' treatment of mini skirts. By Larry Ellis

Women protesting in Great Britten, in order to protect the mini skirt, outside the House of Dior in 1966, for its 'unfair' treatment of mini skirts. By Larry Ellis

Over the past year, there has been countless amounts of evidence proving that fashion and politics can certainly intertwine. Fashion media outlets, Models, women and men alike, used fashion as a tool to demonstrate their take on current social issues. Seeing this has inspired young men and women to speak out on these issues but, the media and double standards also make many nervous to.

 The Chanel spring/summer 2015 fashion show. Photos by Pascal Le Segretain and Patrick Kovarick (Getty)

The Chanel spring/summer 2015 fashion show. Photos by Pascal Le Segretain and Patrick Kovarick (Getty)

People who express a liking in beauty or fashion are still snubbed and rejected from political conversations, as if these interests were exclusive clubs and not to be crossed. Yet, people forget to remember that our clothing does not just reflect our personalities or likings, it also opens a gateway for us to enter influential spaces.

The most relevant example of how people snub fashion lovers was a broadcast on national television last year. Tucker Carlson, a male Fox News host, abruptly concluded the politically charged debate on current social issues with Teen Vogue writer Laura Duca. Carlson told Duca at the end of the 10 minute debate to “stick to the thigh-high boots.”

Throughout the debate, Tucker Carlson continuously demeans Lauren Duca's political stances based on the fact that she has been a fashion contributor for Teen Vogue. Duca took to her next piece for Teen Vogue to explain "the notion that enjoying fashion precludes the potential for critical thought espouses an absurd double standard with obvious roots in sexism." Our interests do not belittle our intelligence and thoughts on a subject, and we should never let anyone make us think they do. 

"The only requirement for expressing your politics is being informed; this applies to future shopping sprees and the next time a middle-aged man tries to tell you what you can and cannot talk about." -Lauren Duca

 From left to right: Prabal Gurung, Public School, Creature of Comfort and Christian Siriano (photo: Rex and Getty)

From left to right: Prabal Gurung, Public School, Creature of Comfort and Christian Siriano (photo: Rex and Getty)

It is our responsibility as American citizens to speak up on matters we truly care about, march for movements that speak to us, and fight to stop policies we know are inhumane. Wanting to have a political opinion does not mean you can't love fashion because we know how much fashion has impacted politics.

Regardless if you like to wear pink or if you write about what celebrities are wearing, our voices on political matters should not be deemed unqualified. Wear your mini skirts and continue to speak on current political issues, let's end the sexism and double standards.